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A PHENOMENON OF LIGHT
OR VISUAL PERCEPTION

that enables one to differentiate otherwise idenctical objects
A SPECIFIC COMBINATION
OF HUE, SATURATION, AND
LIGHTNESS OR BRIGHTNESS
VIVIDNESS OR VARIETY
OF EFFECTS OF LANGUAGE
IS AN INTANGIBLE PART OF THE WORLD
that affects everything about us and around us
Color affects chemicals and
processes in the mind
RED
causes memory
retrieval to be
more detailed
YELLOW
causes memory
retrieval to be
more detailed
ORANGE
makes people
feel warmer
BLUE
suppresses
the appetite
Color affects
physical responses
YELLOW
can create a
sense of optimism
and happiness
BLUE
can calm us
or make us
feel sad
Color can change our
emotional state
Color can heighten our
spiritual senses
VIOLET
stimulates
spiritual
awareness
WHITE
brings a
sense of
harmony
and balance
HOW MANY COLORS ARE THERE?
PSYCHOPHYSICISTS THEORIZE THAT HUMANS CAN SEE
1,000
LEVELS OF LIGHT-DARK
100
LEVELS OF RED-GREEN
100
LEVELS OF YELLOW-BLUE
1,000 X 100 X 100
10 MILLION
LEVELS OF COLOR
Studies have found that condtions such as the amount of light present and the the color of the lighting also affect the colors we see
BECAUSE THE CONDITIONS OF OBSERVATION ARE INFINITE, THE NUMBER OF PERCEIVABLE COLORS IS ALSO INFINITE
HOW DOES Language AFFECT THE WAY WE SEE COLORS?
STUDIES INDICATE THE LANGUAGE WE SPEAK AND OUR COLOR VOCABULARY AFFECT OUR ABILITY TO SEE COLORS
Infants ARE NOT BORN WITH
THE ABILITY TO SEE COLOR
THEIR COLOR VISION DEVELOPS BY
3 - 5 MONTHS
BY THREE YEARS OLD
Young children
CATAGORIZE COLOR
WITH MUCH MORE DISTINCTION
SOME NOW BELIEVE THAT THE ABILITY
TO SEE A COLOR IS DIRECTLY RELATED
TO  KNOWING A NAME FOR THE COLOR 
The language
function of
the brain
automatically
takes control
Color is instantly
transferred from the
right to left hemisphere
where language is
processed
INTRODUCING THE Himba TRIBE
The Himba of Northern Namibia have only 5 words for color
English SPEAKERS
11 COLOR CATEGORIES, AND HUNDREDS OF
WORDS TO DESCRIBE COLORS
Himba TRIBE
5 WORDS
FOR COLOR
Each word
describes a wide
range of color
CC BY-SA 3.0 via
Hans Stieglitz
"Serandu"
Most shades of
red, orange or pink
"Zoozu"
Anything dark; dark
blue, dark green, dark
brown, dark purpler,
dark red, black
"Vapa"
Mainly white,
includes some
shades of yellow
"Burou"
Some shades of
greens and blues
"Dumbu"
Beige, yellow and
some light green
The Himba describe  THE SKY as "Zoozu"
The Himba describe both  WATER & MILK as "Vapa"
One experiment shows the Himba see colors as differently as they describe them
A computer displayed a ring comprised of several different squares
Researchers asked the Himba to identify which
square was different color from the rest
PART 1:
The squares were all green with one
square being a slightly different shade
To English speakers,
the difference was
imperceptible
To the Himba,
the difference was
clearly visible
PART 2:
The squares were green except
for one blue square
To English speakers,
the difference was
clearly visible
To the Himba,
the difference was
imperceptible
The experiment shows a strong correlation between color recognition and language
They use the same word to describe both colors
Russian BLUE
Russian speakers do not have a general term for the color   "blue"
How does this  AFFECT THEIR PERCEPTION OF BLUE compared to English speakers?
English speakers are much quicker to identify colors with two different
names vs. colors with different shades,
but the the same name
ex. red and green
red and a slightly different shade of red
Experiments showed Russian speakers identified different
shades of blue much quicker than English speakers
Which one of the
two bottom squares
matched the color of
the top square
How does this  AFFECT THEIR PERCEPTION OF BLUE compared to English speakers?
This time participants recited
nonsense words
to occupy language
processing areas of the brain
Russian speakers took just as long
as English speakers to differentiate
the same shades of blue