4th of July Inspired Patriotic Clock

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A clock hanging on a blue wall. The clock is painted to look like the patriotic flag.
The 4th of July is only a couple of days away. It’s time to adorn your patriotic spirit and make this fabulous red, white, and blue timepiece.  Henceforth, you can always celebrate the 4th of July each time you look at your clock! 
Materials needed:
materials needed to create project.
Wooden wire spool
Clock movement kit
Paint (We used No More Drama P140-7, Deep Breath S460-7, and New House White RD-W10)
Wooden stars
House numbers (1-12)
Tools needed:
Sandpaper
Mini roller or paintbrush
Hammer
Jigsaw
Saw
Power drill
Wood glue
Ruler
Step 1: Cut your wire spool
Use a saw to cut your wooded wire spool into two pieces.  Keep a small length of the center portion of the piece on the side the clock face will be.
Cutting the wire spool.
Step 2: Sand
Sand down any sharp or uneven surfaces on the side of the wooden wire spool that you want to use.
Sanding the edge of the cut area.
Step 3: Trace flag pattern
 With a ruler measure out and trace the American flag on your spool. 1/4 of the spool face should be reserved for the stars, the remaining 3/4 for the stripes.
Using a ruler and pencil to draw the design on the top of the wooden wire spool.
Step 4: Paint
Once you have traced all of the lines, start painting your colors in. Allow the paint to dry and apply a second coat if necessary/desired.
Applying paint to the top of the wooden spool.
Step 5: Stamp the Stars on
Once the paint has dried, paint a wooden star and place carefully on the blue part. Press down evenly on the star, with care not to shift the star out of place.  Gently remove the star and repeat the step until the section is satisfactorily starred. Painting stars onto a stamp stencil. Stamping the painted star stamp on to flag design. Showing the painted star left behind from the stamp stencil on to the flag design.
Step 6: Mark placement for numbers 3, 6, 9, and 12
Using a ruler, find the four center points on your circle where the numbers 3, 6, 9, and 12 should be attached. These numbers will be your guide numbers when placing the others.
Using a ruler to mark where the clock numbers go. Using a ruler to mark where the clock numbers go from another angle. Adding numbers to the clock.
Step 7: Attach the central numbers
Using a hammer, secure the four guide numbers in place.
Nailing numbers onto the clock.
Step 8: Attach the other numbers
Divide the space between guide numbers into equal parts and position the other numbers accordingly.  Secure each with hammer and nails.
Adding numbers onto the clock.
Step 9: Measure the center hole
By placing the movement kit in the center hole, you can see if the size is correct, or you need an additional circle for the center to cover the hole. In our case, the hole was bigger than the movement kit.
 Placing movement kit in the center hole.
Step 10: Cut out a circle
Trace and cut out a circle bigger than the central hole to attach to the movement kit.
Circle drawn on a piece of wood Person cutting the circle from the piece of wood.
Step 11: Drill a hole
Drill a hole in the center of your wood circle. Make sure the hole is big enough to fit the arm mechanism through.
Drilling a hole in the center of the circle.
Step 12: Paint
With a Mini roller paint the wood circle. Allow to dry and apply second coat if necessary/desired.
Painting the wood circle in white paint.
Step 13: Put all of the pieces together
Follow the instruction on the movement kit package, and attach the clock pieces through the center of the wooden circle.
Attach clock pieces to the painted circle. Attach clock pieces to the painted circle from a different angle
Step 14: Glue
Glue the center wooden piece to your clock with wood glue and let dry.
Adding wood glue to the circle.
Step 15: Hang in place
Hang in place and you are ready to celebrate the 4th!
A clock hanging on a blue wall. The clock is painted to look like the patriotic flag.

Wall color featured: Jean Jacket Blue S510-4

Colorfully yours,
-Sha Khezri

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